About your Search

20121201
20121231
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)
more local or large city looks david roeder rights for the sun times, one of my favorites and put out a piece a couple days ago where he took three washington policy institutes and put together some of their research. he found if you just looked at large cities foreclosures were about 6% but the record is 6.1%. if you loosked at just chicago 8.7% foreclosure rate versus a year ago, year over year at 8.8. so only 0.1 better. if you specifically looked at cook county, their third quarter prices were down 3% year over year. you have the good, the bad, and it gets very difficult to just come up with one lump sum. one thing we can walk away with, it seems as though housing has bottomed. many states deal with the core process of foreclosures and there have been breakthroughs there. i've talked with many experts who really think there is still a shadow inventory of foreclosures that are going to be freed into 2013. you try to figure it out. the last, well maybe this is the credit market side of a possible positive for u.s. treasuries or some of the good ones like boon's. there's a "wall stre
will be doing great. the coastal cities, again, largely rain and travel delays will be impacted significantly where we have new york, philly and d.c. >> sounds like retailers can't catch a brick right now. superstorm system and now the storm is barreling its way across the country and with holiday pale at their weakest, heard that this morning, do retailers, can they make up for last yund. >> thank you. have, why don't you go first. what impact is it going to have? >> you have declining dispose al income and petter problems. you have the retailers that have inconspicuous stock and consumers are concerned about everything from hurricane sandy and the senseless slaughters in sandy hook, connecticut, spending less and giving more to charities. >> jan, i don't want to minimize any of this, the damage that this storm has already inflicted in parts of the country and could still inflict, but we were in an environment where people were just not shopping to begin with. do you think retailers could use this as a good excuse going forward? >> yeah, bert's here with me the four horsemen and apocalypse.
have adopted the regulations, namely -- and i went there and heard the mayor of a fairly large city talk at what he had learned as a mayor. he'd been a central government official before he was posted down and he realized once he got there, the central government officials don't really understand the lives of ordinary people. and then he began to watch the proceedings, the process of drafting the local administrative procedure regulation, and he came to understand the importance of procedural justice that was one of the first times in 35, 40 years of going to china at her to chinese talk about procedural justice. i think that the term is in the vocabulary, and i think that local experimentation may at least help in the incremental building of a changed legal culture. >> that is supposed to be one of the virtues of the american federal system, is called the brandeis, called the laboratories of experiment. now, one problem with having the population of 1.3 billion is it a very big population. it's hard to govern. at one virtue of is you can divide into parts and provinces, and you rea
, large like new york city, was pounded and pounded and pounded by this devastating hurricane. all america watched, we all held our breath, we all feared the worst, and we saw the worst. and, at the same time, we saw the indomitable spirit of the american people hanging onto their home, praying for their livelihood, and while all that was going on and the president visited, the governors on both sides of the aisle, to say you've got the united states of america behind you. well, the united states of america being behind you, whether you're governor o'malley or governor christie or governor cuomo or the other goafns means that we -- governors means that we need to pass this bill, and we want to pass it because we know that lives were devastated and livelihoods were ruined. in maryland, gosh, we faced these unique challenges -- hurricanes, blizzards, urban and rural communities affected. and our own lower shore, some somerset county was hit. that has one of the highest unemployment rates in the city -- in the state, close to 10%. 18% of the residents moved below a line of 35 $$35,000 a year.
. >> it is a very large storm and there's a couple of components to this from kansas city and through des moines then bending back toward milwaukee, that's where the heaviest snow is right now. >> some of those first responders trained for a mass casualty event but certainly never expected to see one. >> you're numb. there is no emotion at that point. you don't fall apart until way later. >> did you fall apart? >> not yet. >> two chicago prisoners are still at large this morning after a daring escape. >> one of their relatives said they could be in paris by now. >> they're cunning, they're daring, and they pulled off something that nobody has pulled off in that jail for 30 years. >> >> i have a problem. >> like a rock? >> the speaker of the house is pushing for a vote on his own plan "b" today. >> if plan "b" doesn't work, they have to go to plan "c," and plan "c," as you know is just pray to end that thegod that the world does end friday. that's plan "c." that's why we're here. >> i'm charlie rose with gayle king and norah o'donnell. the house is set to vote today on spea
, that is likely to conclude that the state department was largely at fault for failures, security failures prior to benghazi. so to blame susan rice who's over at the u.n. mostly in new york city for benghazi is really a stretch. she was the werngs who went out on sunday television. and she said today to brian williams that she is not blameless. i think there was a lack of care with the talking points and the republicans seized on it and claims she was being political and trying to be political at a key point in the presidential election campaign, which she strongly denies. >> but you're saying that the president's statements to that effect were not enough because they were not backed up with essentially procedural support for her to be fighting these attacks that could have happened had he nominated her. >> once she's nominated she is armed with the white house counsel's office-w every wise person, man or woman in washington who would be assigned to her to get her through the nomination process. but she was left -- she said she didn't feel that she's a victim here, but she certainly did acknowl
looking at large, destructive tornadoes. that's why we are concerned about. look at this temperature right here, 9 degrees in omaha, 24 in oklahoma city. the temps plumb it behind the storm and we still watch the severe weather pull off to the south. we will be dealing with blizzard conditions across parts of missouri. i want to show you this bulls sigh for the threat for severe weather. texas, louisiana, mississippi and alabama. unfortunately on christmas you need to have your plans in place if you need to take carve within moments. kelly: that is very important. good job on fox & friends this morning. you are my favorite weatherman. merry christmas to you. >> reporter: and to you. jaime: the tsunamis are really the only thing they have to worry about generally when it comes to wild weather in hawaii and that is not a concern. president obama is there spending time with his family for the holiday and yesterday he went golfing before heading to the beach with the first lady and their daughters. aides say the president will have to return to washington in a day or two to deal with you know
over 40 schools in new york city that are destroyed, mostly by the water. roads, bridges, you name it. the devastation is everywhere, it is wide, it is deep. and so with this kind of devastation, even a large area like new york cannot handle it on its own. and fortunately, mr. president, we've had a wisdom here in this government for close to a century, and that is when nature strikes, when the hand of god comes down on earth and creates the kind of damage that man can't comprehend, that no locality can handle it on its own, and so the federal government steps in. which means the country as a whole steps in. and when there were hurricanes in louisiana and mississippi, the whole country stepped in. we said we know this is too much for to you handle alone. when there were forest fires out west, the whole country stepped in saying we know you can't handle this kind of devastation on your own. when there was flooding in the missouri and mississippi valleys, the same. the federal government came in. and we in new york, hundreds of millions, probably over the decades, billions of our tax do
Search Results 0 to 9 of about 10 (some duplicates have been removed)